The Frankenstein Summer Byron The Frankenstein Summer In The Middle The Frankenstein Summer Declaration The Frankenstein Summer Toast The Frankenstein Summer Mary The Frankenstein Summer Italian Lesson The Frankenstein Summer Beauty

All photos courtesy of Red Light District Theatre

The Frankenstein Summer

Cast Size: 6 (4M, 2W)
Byron most famous poet of the Romantic Age
Polidori Byron’s personal physician
Shelley poet and advocate of “free love”
Mary Shelley’s mistress
Claire Mary’s stepsister and Byron’s former lover
Fletcher Byron’s butler/valet and faithful confidante

Synopsis

Lord Byron, England’s most famous exiled poet, wants to go sailing, but his plans are foiled when a violent storm rocks the shores of Lake Geneva. Frustrated, virtually trapped inside the Villa Diodoti, Byron finds relief when his new friend and neighbor, Percy Shelley, arrives seeking shelter. Accompanying Shelley are his mistress, Mary Godwin, and Mary’s stepsister, Claire. As the rain continues to pour, the friendly gathering of neighbors turns into a weekend fraught with secrets, scandals, ghost stories and musical beds. In other words… things get complicated.

Two Acts
Approximate Running Time: 1h 40m

Production History

Winner, 2004 Hudson River Classics New Play Competition, New York

Winner, 2004 Southwest Theatre Association New Play Prize

Winner, 2004 Theatre Conspiracy’s New Play Prize, Florida

The Frankenstein Summer was first produced in 2005 by The Red Light District Theatre (New York, NY), Red Light District, Producer.





Reviews

“…a literary candy dish of sexually charged hijinks…”
Michael Dale, BroadwayWorld.com

“…an entertaining play, which retells this episode of literary history with sophistication and wit.”
Martin Denton, nytheatre.com

“More to the point, there is thunder and lightning in the dialogue as these literary giants singe each other with language that sparks and burns.”
Barbara & Scott Siegel, Theatremania.com

“Bush’s dialogue is witty with an overlay of the conversational brilliance credited to the dandified British Regency era.”
Frederick M. Winship, UPI